rollingstone:

Last night’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction was an endlessly entertaining, surreally star-packed (Oprah!) night of many wonders and curiosities: Jackson Browne, Tom Petty and  John Fogerty formed a very temporary band with inductee Randy Newman; a strutting Jennifer Hudson channeled Donna Summer; Harry Belafonte solemnly intoned the lyrics of Public Enemy’s “Don’t Believe the Hype”; Dave Grohl and Taylor Hawkins covered Rush while wearing the band’s infamous Seventies kimonos; and Rush themselves led a joyous, all-time great closing jam that saw Chuck D and guest DMC rhyming over the beats of Neil Peart.

A Rush/hip-hop fusion? Well of course.

rollingstone:

Last night’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction was an endlessly entertaining, surreally star-packed (Oprah!) night of many wonders and curiosities: Jackson Browne, Tom Petty and  John Fogerty formed a very temporary band with inductee Randy Newman; a strutting Jennifer Hudson channeled Donna Summer; Harry Belafonte solemnly intoned the lyrics of Public Enemy’s “Don’t Believe the Hype”; Dave Grohl and Taylor Hawkins covered Rush while wearing the band’s infamous Seventies kimonos; and Rush themselves led a joyous, all-time great closing jam that saw Chuck D and guest DMC rhyming over the beats of Neil Peart.

A Rush/hip-hop fusion? Well of course.

A few of us will be discussing Richard Florida’s The Rise of the Creative Class on April 16.  (If you are interested in how local and regional economies work, why the design of urban space matters, and why certain cities attract more creative, talented people than others, please join us).  
Here is an abridged version of the preface to the new edition if you’re not familiar with the book.  Here is Edward Glaeser’s review and Florida’s response to him.  Steven Malanga accuses Florida of promoting a liberal, government-heavy economic agenda that doesn’t work.
Thomas Frank suggests Florida’s creative class exists to entertain the business class.  Ross Douthat mentions Florida in a piece this week on “assortive mating.”

A few of us will be discussing Richard Florida’s The Rise of the Creative Class on April 16.  (If you are interested in how local and regional economies work, why the design of urban space matters, and why certain cities attract more creative, talented people than others, please join us).  

Here is an abridged version of the preface to the new edition if you’re not familiar with the book.  Here is Edward Glaeser’s review and Florida’s response to him.  Steven Malanga accuses Florida of promoting a liberal, government-heavy economic agenda that doesn’t work.

Thomas Frank suggests Florida’s creative class exists to entertain the business class.  Ross Douthat mentions Florida in a piece this week on “assortive mating.”

Book Group meets this coming Tuesday for a conversation on Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall.  Here are reviews by Huff Post, Benfy in the NYT, Maslin in the NYT, the Guardian, the New Yorker, the Atlantic, and the Telegraph.

Book Group meets this coming Tuesday for a conversation on Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall.  Here are reviews by Huff Post, Benfy in the NYT, Maslin in the NYT, the Guardian, the New Yorker, the Atlantic, and the Telegraph.

The Internet is great.  But good and local reporting on important issues is getting harder to come by.  Conor Friedersdorf explains why here.  
For example, I’m pretty well informed on the debt crisis in Cyprus.  But I need major help understanding what Kansas Governor Sam Brownback is doing to our local education budget.  And our local crisis of education budgets is WAY more important to my life.  So, Fort Scott Tribune, we need your very best reporting on stuff that really matters.  A great education is a must for kids.  Yet Brownback has slashed education spending in a way that will mean something between $22 and $75 less funding per student, a level far below the level of funding required by the courts.  Even Moody’s responded with a “negative” rating on Kansas due to the underfunding of education.  Brownback’s budget is garnering wide ranging ridicule from places like Salon, and the NYT.  How about a little less on quilting circles and random opinion pieces and a little more actual journalism on stuff that matters?

The Internet is great.  But good and local reporting on important issues is getting harder to come by.  Conor Friedersdorf explains why here.  

For example, I’m pretty well informed on the debt crisis in Cyprus.  But I need major help understanding what Kansas Governor Sam Brownback is doing to our local education budget.  And our local crisis of education budgets is WAY more important to my life.  So, Fort Scott Tribune, we need your very best reporting on stuff that really matters.  A great education is a must for kids.  Yet Brownback has slashed education spending in a way that will mean something between $22 and $75 less funding per student, a level far below the level of funding required by the courts.  Even Moody’s responded with a “negative” rating on Kansas due to the underfunding of education.  Brownback’s budget is garnering wide ranging ridicule from places like Salon, and the NYT.  How about a little less on quilting circles and random opinion pieces and a little more actual journalism on stuff that matters?

Wish you could vicariously experience life in the East Village in the 1970’s?  You could form a band and do lots of drugs.  Or, you could check out the memoirs of Richard Hell’s I Dreamed I Was a Very Clean Tramp, Patti Smith’s Just Kids, and James Wolcott’s Lucking Out.

Wish you could vicariously experience life in the East Village in the 1970’s?  You could form a band and do lots of drugs.  Or, you could check out the memoirs of Richard Hell’s I Dreamed I Was a Very Clean Tramp, Patti Smith’s Just Kids, and James Wolcott’s Lucking Out.

Sheryl Sandberg - a successful leader at Google and now at Facebook - writes about the life choices women make in her book, Lean In.  Here is her TED talk and Commencement Address.  Here are reviews by Anne-Marie Slaughter in the NYT, Slaughter in the Atlantic, Jodi Kantor, Zoe Williams, Emma Brockes, Maureen Dowd, and Avivah Wittenberg-Cox, which deal with some of the important issues Sandberg raises.

Sheryl Sandberg - a successful leader at Google and now at Facebook - writes about the life choices women make in her book, Lean In.  Here is her TED talk and Commencement Address.  Here are reviews by Anne-Marie Slaughter in the NYT, Slaughter in the Atlantic, Jodi Kantor, Zoe Williams, Emma Brockes, Maureen Dowd, and Avivah Wittenberg-Cox, which deal with some of the important issues Sandberg raises.

Doubt, Deconstruction, Capitalism, & Church

imageThis article by Jeremy John is a little dense at points.  The spirit of the piece is prophetic.  The only quibble I have is that it is a little flat-footed about “capitalism.”  There is no one thing called “capitalism.”  So I suggest inserting “capitalism as it currently exists,” or “unregulated capitalism,” or “dehumanizing capitalism.”


Is your city “vibrant”?

Thomas Frank on our penchant for over-using the word “vibrant” to describe where we want to live, the cultural invisibility of people who aren’t “cool,” and how it all relates to rural depopulation.